Better Luck with your Health

By: Janae Bailey




St. Patrick’s day is celebrated the 17th of March annually, the traditional death date of St. Patrick in 461 AD. Since then, we’ve developed many traditions to honor the patron saint of Ireland, one of them being the consumption of alcohol. During the 17th and 18th century, periodic famines swept through Ireland; by the early 1600s, alcohol (specifically Irish Whiskey) was used to mask the chronic pain of hunger (O’Connor, 2012). Even with Irish immigrants assimilating to the American culture, alcohol abuse has now become an acceptable tradition amongst Americans and Irish Americans as a means to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day.

Don’t leave your health to luck. Here’s why you shouldn’t drink alcohol this St. Patrick's Day:


Short-Term Health Risks

Motor vehicle crashes, falls, drownings, and burns (CDC, 2018).

Violent behavior (CDC, 2018).

Alcohol poisoning (CDC, 2018).


Long-Term Health Risks

High blood pressure, heart disease, liver disease, and stroke (CDC, 2018).

Cancer of the breath, mouth, esophagus, liver, and colon (CDC, 2018).

Alcohol dependence, addiction, or alcoholism (CDC, 2018).

Pregnant women should not drink, as it may cause miscarriage, stillbirth, or fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (CDC, 2018).


How can you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day without alcohol?

Wear green! The legend is, wearing green makes you invisible to leprechauns (Davidson, 2015).


Attend a St. Patrick’s Day festival or parade, usually held in NYC.

Try corned beef and cabbage, a traditional Irish dish.

If you or a loved one is suffering from alcohol abuse please seek help from the following resources:


Alcohol Anonymous: https://aa.org

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration: 1 (800) 622-4357

This concludes NSO’s lucky advise for you!

Stay tuned for April’s article on Multiple Sclerosis.

Until then,

May the road rise up to met you!

Yours truly,

Janae Bailey and Darizta Munoz, on behalf of the Nursing Student Organization (NSO)

For more information regarding NSO, please contact us as nso@pccc.edu

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